Hope is the disease | A Fifth Season

Posted by on Feb 4, 2012 in Events
I need your help.

On May 5, 2012 we have the privilege of covering the second annual “A Fifth Season” fundraiser in Chicago, IL.

We shot a short documentary to premiere at the event, profiling three local families affected by Batten Disease (who are hosting the event to help fund further research into treatments and a cure). As we went through the highly emotional process of learning the ins and outs of these families and how to best convey their walk in life, we came to a cross roads while finishing up the trailer….

“Hope is the disease”

At the end of the video above, we attached the tag line “Hope is the disease”. Being that I’ve never had a family member diagnosed with Batten disease, I can’t quite grasp what that feels like. But, from where I stand, the phrase has great depth and significance.

Here’s where you help
  1. Watch the trailer
  2. Tell us how you interpret “Hope is the disease” in the comment section below

5 Comments

  1. Eric
    February 5, 2012

    First off this is shot and edited so well. The beginning really got me hooked and interested. I loved the way the beginning “outtakes” give the clip a real human feel. Made me instantly empathetic for the subjects.

    I felt at the end of the video though that it would circle back in some way. It seemed to me like there was more to come. Maybe that is how I was supposed to feel, but it seemed incomplete to me.

    What I got out of “hope is the disease” (not knowing anything about the disease itself really) is that the hardest thing to deal with is hope that things will get better instead of acceptance of the way things are. I thought this was captured pretty well at the 2 min mark.

    Very nice work!

    Reply
    • Eric Leslie
      February 5, 2012

      Hope is powerful and infectious. Thanks for the thoughts Eric (wonderful name, by the way)!!!

      Reply
  2. Anitakprinty
    February 5, 2012

    WOW…. Hope is the seeming paradox…. we can all learn something from this!… thanks for sharing.

    Reply
  3. Russ
    February 5, 2012

    The production value is really good. Very clean, good pacing. I also really liked how it started off with a super initmate feel with these families. My only criticism would be; the audio drop at the :40 mark kinda threw me offf a bit. I thought that was a bit unnecessary.

    Conent-wise, after that :40 mark everything took the turn for the hopeless. I’m watching this thinking “I’m really not in the mood for a good cry today.” It seems like a polarizing sort of thing, either people will get interested and watch or they’ll get the “I don’t want to be depressed today.” attitude.

    The tagline really feels like a punch in the gut to me. It hammers home the idea that this is a really bad disease and it’s not going to get better anytime soon. But as someone who works at a hospital (I’m a video producer at Walter Reeed National Military Medical Center), this idea goes counter to what I’m used to seeing and I think there’s a good chance it would at least draw a fair amount of curiosity (which a good tagline should do!).

    Overall, I liked the trailer, but feel it’s a Doc I’d really have to be in the right mood to watch.

    Reply
    • Eric Leslie
      February 5, 2012

      Thanks for breaking it down Russ. Sometimes we need a good punch in the gut.

      Reply

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